About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 5
KCSM (PBS) 4
CNBC 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
FBC 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
LINKTV 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
in brussels. we asked her if the eu is prepared to back the call for war crimes. >> the problem there is the u.n. security council would have to refer the case to the courts and the eu has failed in its attempts to get russia, a permanent member of the u.n. security council, to put pressure on their ally, syria. they say they welcome any attempts from any side to end the conflict and end the violence happening. they have always said that they were concerned about crimes committed against humanity and they have always stressed that they will do everything that they can to support moves to end the conflict in syria. >> we will have more in a moment, but staying in brussels , they have agreed to renew an arms embargo against syria. britain wanted to allow the nation's two armed forces, but many say neither side should be armed with weapons from europe. sanctions are also amended to provide greater humanitarian and technical assistance and protection of civilians. let us turn now to nina to ask for more about the foreign minister's reasoning for renewing the arms embargo on syria. >> most eu count
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the country are listening for that. they are listening for all the little programs that the rest of you ridicule, and he is telegraphing he gets what their problems are and he is on their side. that is very important politically. >> i will help redeem the president all right? he is on the wake of three weeks away from his earlier address at the inauguration okay? people saw that. and i think they feel he is going to be repeating that. and that is probably a big reason why they didn't tune in. therefore, he gets a pass. what do you think? >> also i think that's right. i think eleanor's right if you are watching it on white house.gov my wife watched it on her ipad. that doesn't show up in the neilsen ratings. a lot of people were watching it online or watching it the next day. tv consumption is changing. >> the oratory about they deserve a vote and going through all the gun victims, those are real people and they were sitting there. >>
minister gave the house an update on the eu negotiations on the budget, and he will know that regional aid, which comes from the eu, plays an important role for some of the regional assemblies when it comes to attracting inward investment. will he update the house on the continuation of regional aid? >> the outcome of the budget leaves the amount of overall regional aid that britain will receive broadly similar to the last period at around 11 billion. there are changes in the definitions of regions, partly because of the new concept of transition regions. what we now need to do is to sit down, as the united kingdom, and work out how best to make sure that the money is fairly divided between wales, northern ireland, scotland and england. there are transition regions in england that are looking to benefit, but i am sure that we can have fruitful discussions and come to a good conclusion. >> is my right honorable friend amused that the leader of the opposition and the deputy prime minister are both trying to claim credit for his brilliant achievement of a real-terms cut in the eu budget? does
. the united states will seem approval from congress while the eu council takes the next steps in its process. both sides aim to launch official negotiations this summer. the biggest obstacle is deferring regulations on beef. the eu has stricter safe rules than the u.s. he's heading a delegation from the european parliament. the delegates will be meeting with japanese lawmakers to discuss the planned partnership. >> it's good for japan. it's good for european union. i expect trade talks wil produce talks in one or two years. >> negotiations are likely to begin in march. that's the latest in business for this hour. here is a check on regional markets. >>> south korea's elect says he may revise how park geun-hye says she may revise how she deals with north korea from the start. her political platform includes building better relations. >> translator: the north should understand that with any further provocation we will no longer be able to have a dialogue even if we want to. >> park spoke to a transition committee who are working on other foreign relation matters. she says the test shows the di
>>> the european union tightened sanctions on north korea. eu foreign ministers say authorities in north korea have endangered security worldwide. leaders followed through on their threats last week and carried out another underground nuclear tests. the ministers expanded. the sanctions also banned the export and import of components that could be used in ballistic missiles including certain types of aluminum. they say they put a satellite into orbit. but weern leaders say the north kores we devopin balltic missil which can rry nuclr payload. netanyahu says the fact they went ahead with the tests show sanctions don't work. he says it was proof world leaders should do more to stop nuclear ambitions in another nation, iran. netanyahu told international jewish leaders gathered in jerusalem that embargoes should be coupled with a military threat. >> even tougher sanctions will not stop them. case in point, north korea. have sanctions, tough sanctions, stopped north korea? no. >> israeli leaders believe their counterparts in iran are trying to develop nuclear weapons. the israelis ha
a warhead small enough to fit on a long range missile. the eu secured council called an emergency meeting. chery joins us now from seoul. can you tell us first of all what the general reaction has been there and a lot bit about the impact of the economy. we're watching, for example, the south korea and won take a hit this morning. >> well within not much of a reaction on the kospi. it did end down just about 0.26% here. but i wouldn't say it's a big tumble and it is korean won gained. i think by now investors have learned that north korea related tensions and developments, geopolitical issues like this have had impact on the korean market. so that explains the absence of such strong reaction on the stock market. but the latest that we have on this development is that we have china's reaction to north korea's nuclear tests, as well. china's foreign ministry statement goes that it is china's firm stance to realize nonnuclearization for the korean peninsula and prevent a nuclear proliferation and maintain peace and stability in northeast asia. remember, china is north korea's probably one an
with the european union. cyprus asked the eu and others for a bailout package last june, but have yet to reach a deal. >>> and now to the latest on the academy awards held sunday night in los angeles. this 85th edition saw the triumph of "argo" directed by ben affleck. it won in the best picture and two other categories. "argo" competed against several high-profile features including steve spielberg's "lincoln" and "zero dark 30." ben affleck's film received two more oscars in the film editing and adapted screenplay categories. ang lee snatched best director for "life of pi". it received the largest number of awards. there were a total of four oscars. daniel day-lewis' portrayal of abraham lincoln earned him the best actor award. he was the first man to be awarded three oscars in this category. media in iran have criticized "argo" for being what they call a highly fictitious account of the crisis and portraying iranians as evil. our correspondent in tehran says iranian producers are working on their own version of the story. >>> japan's prime minister named his choice for the next bank of japa
: on that note -- dagen: a letter to the eu blasting the new tax on financial transactions because it is hurting investors worldwide. here with more is elizabeth macdonald. liz: it is coming from the financial services round table, the big u.s. bank. they are sending it to the eu. they sent it late yesterday. eleven countries are moving to the tobin tax. it is a 0.1% tax that would hit your 401(k)s. it is a blistering letter. you have to stop this tobin packs and it tracks. it will increase trading costs. it will diminish liquidity. it is a job killer. they also say they did not want a similar type of tax because it will kill jobs. the eu right now is in depression. it is in serious need of revenue. it will violate international treaties. they are worried about treaty protection. also, the big and run that is being talked about at the eu is that traders that assess this tax and do the trades outside that zone, those companies will not be allowed to do any trade transactions with those 11 countries whatsoever. this is serious breaking news for investors all over the world. connell: this would hit
. >>> nicholas anastasia swept to an election victory on sunday. he pledged to work with the country's eu partner toes secure a swift rescue package, insisting that the new government would prepare such an image around the world. >>> and a slowdown in chinese exports has been pulling back on the economy. it posted a fourth consecutive month of expansion. china's hsbc flash pmi index for february slipped to 50.4, the lowest reading in four months and down from a two-year high in january of 52.3. no one is hitting the panic button just yet. >> while the flash pmi slipped from a two-year high in yarn, it tells us china's economic recovery is intact. 6.4 is considered that the week long lunar new year holiday fell in february of this year. look back at lunar new year last year and you can see some of the distortion effect it fell in january 2012. what may be worry background this month's flash pmi is the new export orders subindex. it inched down to contraction territory, add to go existing worries about this sector. taken as a whole, the flash pmi number is the earliest indicator of china's health a
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
of government. and the times of london picked up on this piece. a new plan for the eu. the big international news is that the president announced 34,000 troops in afghanistan will come home in a year. >> tonight i can announce that over the next year, another 34,000 american troops will come home from afghanistan. this drawdown will continue and by the end of next year or war in afghanistan will be over. [ applause ] >> i want to bring in richard engel. welcome to both of you. >> nice to be here. again, second in a row. >> let's talk about foreign affairs that had been telegraphed by the white house. he talked about afghanistan, a very brief mention of the middle east. what kind of reaction are you hearing across this part of the world? >> not a great reaction. not much reaction at all. he barely mentioned the middle east. i think people in the middle east had been look iing for a little bit more u.s. leadership on syria. and there's a recognition in the region that syria is a black hole that could suck the other countries into. it. and all the president said was, we continue to oppose assad
nutrition, be well fed and a safe food supply. it is an honor to may pa*eu -- pay tribute to those at kansas state university, to make sure it remains a place of higher education and learning in our state, but also to make certain that kansas state university, manhattan, kansas, is always that place called home, where students from across our state and around the globe feel like they found a family and a place to learn and improve their lives and to make certain that they contribute to the betterment of our world. it's an honor to be here with one of the most distinguished alumnus of kansas state university, my colleague and friend, senator roberts, to wish that kansas state university many more years of success in providing education to our students and moving our state forward in ways that will only benefit not only this generation but those that follow us. so congratulations, can -- kansas state university. happy 150th birthday. mr. president, i yield back to the senator from kansas. mr. roberts: i thank my dear friend and colleague more specially for highlighting what k-state is all abou
by regulation under the legislation, and then we have e.u. sanctions. >> right. >> and, indeed, sanctions that other people follow that are mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be, on this issue, potentially more flexible than we are. and so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on that could be helpful as an initial step. and, obviously, that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain that he's getting value. that the europeans could take sanctions off central banks and petroleum, for example. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons. and when i was in the security council, the first sanctions on iraq after their invasion of kuwait we made it scrupulously careful. that got all screwed up in oil for food. and i don't want to spend time here talking about that, but -- >> many. [inaudible] >> that was a perfect example of how things could go wrong. but the fundamental basis was the right bas
, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, said it is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the that could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum, for reasonable. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq, we made it carefully. that got screwed up and oil for food, and i did not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders' summit if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where we have brought b
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
department focused on energy diplomacy as well as new partnerships like the u.s. e.u. energy council we work intensively with the iraqis to support their energy sector because it is critical not only to their economy but their stability as well. we have significantly intensifiintensifi ed efforts to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. it's no accident that is as the iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot in a fit from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states where it led the world in recognizing universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the frontline of today's emerging battle like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities aroun
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
is a challenge t to all of us on both sides of the 50eu8, bot-- bothsides of the aisle, bs of the rotunda, to take the student debt crisis seriously. madam president, i yield the floor and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: william quorum call:
-- inside "the baltimore sun" -- then in foreign affairs news -- then, the eu decides not to arm rebels in syria -- that is the washington post this morning. bp is ready for court -- the washington post is reporting about strange bedfellows -- there is a provision in the bill that charges a smoker 50% more for medications and patience to do not use a stick -- who do not use tobacco. here is a quote -- we're talking about armed guards in school. we have time for one more phone call. nick in columbus -- colombia, maryland, you're the last. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. host: what are your thoughts? caller: we are very reactive, not proactive. it is only a matter of time before we should have expected something like this to happen in a school. this keeps repeating and repeating. we put guards in their pour about four years. then we cut money out of the budget. something will happen, we will put them back in. for my republican friends who said he wants teachers to take training, they cannot stop dating our students. how will they be able to carry a gun? i do not think th
the ambassadors to the united states from e.u. countries. so they are doing a european idol. sports metaphor. they have an american comment to launch entertainment. so i gave a speech in a figurehead got good friends here, let's have a little fun. let's talk about red nations, detentions and interrogation. i'm sorry to be flip, but i wanted them to understand our thinking. i knew they didn't agree with your thinking, but i wanted them to understand it. this is one i did a lot of work on my own. page two or three are gathered to european diplomats. let me tell you what i believe, the agency believes, government police and i believe that my nation believes. we're a nation at war with al qaeda and its affiliates. this was global in scope and the only way i can fulfill my legal and moral responsibility to make citizens to take this fight that enemy wherever they may be. war, al qaeda, global. there is another country there who agreed with it. they not only rejected the four sentences for them, they did not believe in legitimacy of those four sentences for us. so the ca or aaron and drone strikes
negotiations with europe on a u.s.-eu trade ownership. we could not agree more. let's hurry up and put american business to work. let's get these deals done. by the way, it is not just about asia. it includes all the coasts of the united states and canada and america. it is fascinating. we need to get this going and move that european deal. the working group is about to put out a report. i think it will probably sustain the best teams we can think about. let me give you this in a minute. europe is in a slow economy. europe is our largest export partner. europe is china's largest export your. china is our fastest growing export partner. if europe goes into the can, the whole triangle goes in the can. that is a bad idea. this would be huge on both sides of the pond. there are a lot of big trade agreements that have been talked about or a long time. these would put cash on the table right now. it is important that we welcome global investment. we want people to bring their cash here. come here and invest or come here and visit. the terrorism is a great way -- tourism is a great way. we like that.
-- >> the u.s./eu free trade agreement. >> i disagree with that. >> they have big deficiencies, and actually a bulwark on standard setting -- >> you disagree with the idea of trade -- >> no i definitely think trade boosts growth and want to see more net exports. what i have never seen is a connection between free trade agreements and an increase in our gdp or even our positive trade balance. more often than not -- >> when you look at nafta, haven't they finally concluded that there were more jobs created here because we were selling more? >> no, in fact, nafta is a -- nafta is a good example -- >> trade balance with mexico went negative. i'm saying after nafta our trade deficit with mexico went from positive to negative. >> nothing happens in a vacuum. >> it's a -- >> but -- >> current -- >> intellectually -- >> don't you know that free trade -- >> absolutely. i'm all for free trade. the nafta we were just talking about, it was 1200 pages. it actually doesn't take that long to write a free trade agreement. the nafta and many others -- >> that was shorter than the health care reform bill? >>
of say, how about the last few years? the u.s. emissions are down, i think 8%. e.u. emissions are down 9%. chinese emissions are up 30%. look at where the coal is being burned. i think in five years india is supposed to become the second largest burner of coal right behind china. the gobal picture -- if the national one isn't enough to make you cry, think globally about where we're going. so that's the crying part. you asked me for bright spots. there are actually are some, so relax. the new car standards will double fuel economy by 2025. california is moving ahead and it is a real bright spot. they are strengthening their targets, that's a bright spot. they got a plan, they have a program, south korea is thinking about instituting emissions trading. china has seven experiments around the country looking at emissions trading. you see some signs then you have these big looming clouds. we have to find a way to get through this and, god, i hope you're not looking for me for all the answers. it isn't all bleak but people better get on to it and get on to it really fast. otherwise it will get
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)